Date Last Updated
  September 16, 2019
Father and Son Antiques
Phone : 201-213-1483
E-Mail :  clocks1@ptd.net
fatherandsonantiqueclocks.com
Sussex County, New Jersey
RECENT ADDITIONS

Wall & Tall Clocks​​

Aaron Willard Jr. Crossbanded Alarm Banjo Clock​

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1815-20

Excellent Aaron Willard Jr. crossbanded time and alarm banjo clock with makers name appearing both on the dial and die-stamped into the front movement plate. The crossbanded frames and case are in outstanding condition with a beautiful old mellow finish. Nice matching inventory markings "II" on multiple parts of case. Original painted iron dial, with untouched surface, is signed in bold script "A. Willard Jr. Boston" with inventory number over the center arbor.  Signature is worn but quite legible. All three steel hands are original. The clock retains its original reverse painted glasses which are in superior condition and held in place by the original wood strips and finishing nails. The colorful glasses have a desirable mustard exterior along with a red, green and gilt interior border. Very minor touch up primarily to throat and box interior borders. The central portion of the throat glass has a striking blue and red background with fine floral gilt designs. The lower glass depicts an interesting country farm scene. Original steel alarm bell, brass bezel and sidearms. Original large eight day brass single bridge movement attaches to the case with diagonal through bolts. The movement is die stamped 'A. Willard Jr. Boston" on the very bottom of the front plate. Original pendulum rod and brass bob. Original time weight with nicely replaced small alarm weight. Original long tin weight guide in throat section creates separate channels for the time and alarm weight to each travel freely. Original weight pan and brass tie down. The lower case box is lined with original glue blocks. This is one of the later crossbanded examples produced by Aaron Willard Jr. as evidenced by the country theme in the lower glass, attachment of the throat frame using lower steel tabs vs. screws through the frame into the case sides, and single vs. t-bridge suspension.  A rare and colorful example of a signed Aaron Willard Jr. alarm patent timepiece with fine form and in wonderful original condition. 
Price: Please Call or E-Mail for Price

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William Cummens Crossbanded Banjo Clock With Rare Bill Of Sale

Roxbury Massachusetts - Ca. 1821

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Outstanding example of an early William Cummens crossbanded banjo clock. Following apprenticeship with the Willard's, both Elnathen Taber and William Cummens, the two finest apprentices, went into business on their own. Crossbanded case examples in the early Simon Willard fashion by either maker are rarely found and highly prized today. Both quickly moved with the times and produced far more gilt front and later half round mahogany framed cases.  While Taber continued to work for the Willard family for years to come, Cummens became completely independent in business and his clocks greatly reflect his own approach and style. The accompanying Bill of Sale for this clock is dated 1821, which supports such an early case form produced by Cummens.  The clock retains its original painted iron dial signed in bold script "Warranted by Wm. Cummens".  The dial surface is in excellent original condition with just minor touch up near the center arbor and around the bent screws attaching the dial to the head of the case. Original steel hands with short barbs typical of those used by Cummens. The iron dial is not as thick as that used by the Willard's which is also classic and in line with virtually all Cummens timepieces.  At some point in time, the date on the Bill of Sale was lightly penned in just above the numeral VI. It is quite worn and faded at this point. The glasses on the clock are original and have wonderful colors. The throat glass is of traditional Cummens style with a red and gilt interior border matching that of the lower box glass and a curved "Patent" logo in the bottom. Impressive green and blue interior colors are topped with traditional gilt designs. There are two professionally bonded cracks in the throat which are so tight they are barely noticeable. The lower box glass depicts an early Neptune chariot painting of the finest form with bright pink and yellow rays of the sun surrounding the pendulum aperture.  Both glasses with a classic white exterior border.  Original brass ball and spire finial, bezel and sidearms. Original eight day brass T-Bridge movement attaches to the case with small diagonal through bolts, and has short front and back plates, again all typical of Cummens work.  An incredibly rare and original example of an early signed William Cummens patent timepiece of the finest form and in wonderful original condition. The original Bill of Sale has been nicely framed and accompanies this fine clock. Provenance : Clarence Prickett Antiques, Yardley Pennsylvania.
Price: Sold​​

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Joshua Wilder Tabernacle Mirror Clock

Hingham Massachusetts - Ca. 1815

Exceptionally rare and early gilded mirror clock made by Joshua Wilder in Hingham Massachusetts. This clock is referred to as a Tabernacle Mirror Clock as the front so closely resembles the fine Tabernacle Looking Glasses of the Period. 

Joshua Wilder began primarily as a tall case clock maker beginning in 1807 in Hanover MA, moving to Hingham in 1810. At that time, production of the more cost effective Patent TImepiece (Banjo Clock) was rapidly expanding and had begun replacing demand levels for locally produced tall case clocks. To better compete, Wilder shortly followed certain of the early Hanover clockmakers and began to also produce a lower cost Dwarf Tall Case Clock. He would continue and refine production for more than a decade, becoming the primary maker of this clock form. This important mirror clock suggests that Wilder also attempted to enter the wall clock market during this early time frame as well.

The clock case is a wonderful diminutive size at only 27 1/2 inches in height and just 12 inches wide in the center. The door, original to this case, was clearly obtained from a Looking Glass Manufactory. Form and construction is entirely consistent with tabernacle looking glasses of the Period, the only exception being a dial surround reverse painted glass to allow view of the clock dial vs. a fully painted scene. Wilder signed the mirror backboard in black paint “J. Wilder Hingham, Handle it very carefully.” (Further comments on use of this door are below). The formal gilded surface of this clock is original and untouched.  All 13 spherules on the upper cornice are original and present as are the turned rope moldings which run down the sides of the frame. The original brass door pull is finely decorated with a star in the center and knurled edge. The unusual brass door latching mechanism on the side of the case is original as well. The case is nicely dovetailed at the top and bottom, and retains its original surface on the sides. Very interesting tombstone shaped sidelights with clear glasses possibly original, certainly Period. The clock retains its original upper reverse painted glass with multi-colored floral decorations of red, light green and yellow. Original mirror is in outstanding condition. Both glasses are held in place by the original blocks. The painted iron dial is original and the surface is untouched. The dial has beautifully executed Arabic numerals and a gilt interior chapter ring, both very typical of Wilder clocks. The iron dial is quite heavy, which is a very early feature consistent with findings in Patent Timpieces of the same Period. The back of the dial is signed in bold script "J. Wilder,  Hingham". This method and form of signature is consistent with other signatures found on the back of his Dwarf Clocks of the Period as well (see detailed photos for example). The finely shaped open steel hands are original as well. The original eight day brass movement with passing strike mechanism is supported by a shelf which runs the full width of the case interior, and is attached to the back of the case with original diagonal throughbolts. The manner in which the shelf is set inside the case is the same method found in many Wilder Dwarf Clocks making it likely that Wilder used the same cabinetmaker for this unusual case. The use of diagonal throughbolts is also very interesting, as Wilder with no history of securing wall clock movements, chooses the same method used in the Patent Timpieces of this early time period. The passing strike feature was also used in some of his early Dwarf Clocks. Original pendulum rod and brass bob.  Original weight. Possibly even the original key. The identical unique key form, with different proportions, was noted in a Wilder Dwarf Clock. The condition of this clock is nothing short of extraordinary and certainly has many ties back to early Wilder dwarf clocks and other early Americana Ca. 1815. Classifying any Americana as being "in the black" is used far too easily these days. This clock absolutely takes its place in that incredibly rare category.

No banjo clocks were made in Southeastern Massachusetts until after 1816, following the expiration of Simon Willard’s Patent. Exceedingly few other Wilder mirror clocks are known, and he eventually entered the banjo clock market by the early 1820's, although never a significant maker of such clocks.  Note that at the time this clock was produced the New England mirror clock does not yet exist. The methods in which this mirror clock was produced, and the fact that it pre-dates the mass introduction of New England mirror clocks by several years, strongly suggests that this clock was a form of early "experiment" by Wilder in his effort to find additional ways to compete with the growing Patent Timepiece market.   
  
This example tells a very clear and interesting story of how this “experiment” was produced. The tabernacle mirror door was initially a fully completed Looking Glass of the same Period, which Wilder altered and attached to this specifically produced mirror clock case.
  
Virtually all of these Period mirrors were hung on the wall with a cord tethered through two deep diagonal holes which start at the very top of the upper cornice and run clear through to the back of the cornice. These two holes are present on this clock door and are unused. A thin pine backboard ran the full length of these Looking Glass frames tacked all the way around the rear edge with very fine finishing nails. This backboard was cut down by Wilder on the top and left hand side and the smaller board was inset into the rear of the lower frame to protect the mirror. There are holes along the bottom and right hand side of this board which directly correspond to punctures in the rear of the door frame, and expected similar puncture marks continue around the entire back of the frame. The original pins to hold the smaller board in place are still present. The mirror is held in place by the original glue blocks placed by the Looking Glass Manufactory.   
    
In the upper section of the frame, the reverse painted dial surround glass is held in place with two glue blocks on top, which match those used to hold the lower mirror in place including the hide glue, and the other three sides of the glass are held in place by four original blocks of a slightly different form secured with the original finishing pins. These blocks, put in place by Wilder, evidences the fact that he needed to replace the fully painted scene put in place by the Looking Glass Firm with a reverse painted glass which would allow view of the clock dial.    

The New England mirror clock was being produced by several makers by the mid 1820's with expanding production into the 1830's. The formal and more costly tabernacle form was never placed into production in any significant numbers. Was this earlier experimental wall clock and ones like it the inspiration for these slightly later and very popular mirror clocks? Perhaps...., but regardless, this clock measured just on its own with beautiful unique form, wonderful proportions and incredible untouched condition, is simply an historical marvel.
Price: Sold

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David Williams Banjo Clock

Newport Rhode Island - Ca. 1820

Rare and fine early signed banjo clock made by David Williams in Newport. Williams, clearly the leading patent timepiece maker in Rhode Island, produced clocks with very unique characteristics from the form of the movements to much of the case construction.  He utilized a local Newport cabinetmaker, John Young, who carried on the tradition of fine craftsmanship seen in early Rhode Island furniture.  This clock reflects all of these unique characteristics including the wonderful "A-Frame" movement, chimney with wide base transitioning to an exceedingly narrow upper portion, thin rectangular coved shaped glue blocks in the lower box, high pendulum tie down bar assembly above the pendulum bob, wide corner lap joints on the lower frame, high quality heavy iron dial with inner gilt chapter ring, and colorful glasses.  While not the only form produced, this clock also features broad flat mahogany veneered frames only found on these Rhode Island cases.  The finish on the case is original with normal age cracks and a couple of veneer chips. The clock has its original painted iron dial with fine Arabic numerals in untouched condition.  Original steel hands.  The clock retains its original reverse painted glasses. The lower glass depicts a form of castle or house of worship by a lake with superb and desirable interior border colors of green, gold and red, gilt decorations and a mustard exterior border. The throat glass with red banner signed "D. Williams" and red interior field also has fine gilt decorations and a matching mustard exterior border. There has been restoration to the exterior throat border due to a partial over-paint at some point. Fortunately, the signed banner and central portion of the throat were not affected by this. Interesting are the tightly painted borders in both glasses and off-center throat banner. Same treatment in similar example can be seen in "American Banjo Clocks by Petrucelli and Sposato" page 117. Minor touch up to lower glass mustard border. The glasses are held in place primarily by the original blocks with fine finishing pins found in other such Rhode Island examples. Original brass bezel with knurled edge, and sidearms. The narrow gilded acorn finial is likely original to the case as well. It is certainly Period and fits the top of the narrow chimney well. Touch up to gilding on finial. Original eight day brass "A-Frame" movement is held in place by three bent slotted screws with one replaced. Original weight. Original pendulum rod and brass bob.  Original glue blocks in lower box with some re-gluing and a crack in the bottom board has been repaired. Original tin weight baffle. A fine signed and rare original Rhode Island banjo clock with all the interior and exterior qualities that define this important clockmaker and the Rhode Island school for patent timepieces of the Period.
Price: Sold

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Simon Willard & Son Banjo Clock
Faux Mahogany Glasses

Roxbury Massachusetts - Ca. 1825

Very fine signed banjo clock with rare reverse painted glasses which simulate figured mahogany. This treatment is referred to as faux mahogany. The clock is signed on the dial "Simon Willard & Son, No. 4721".  This was a partnership of Simon Willard and Simon Jr. which operated from 1823-1828 in Roxbury. The clock case is in nice clean original condition and has been refinished at some point. The half round mahogany frames have very fine graining, which pairs nicely with the excellent glasses. The faux mahogany decorated reverse painted glasses are original to the clock, have a wonderful light overall color and very lively graining. The wood strips securing the glasses in the frames have been replaced, likely at the time the case was refinished.  The original painted iron dial is held in place by two bent screws and two guide pins. This is the traditional dial mounting arrangement found on these clocks.  The surface of the dial is in wonderful untouched condition and is classic in form for this partnership. The signature is done in beautiful script and includes inventory No. 4721. Original steel arrow shaped hands. Original brass bezel and clear glass over dial. The original eight day brass movement has a single bridge suspension and attaches to the case with two diagonal throughbolts. The form of the movement and the use of throughbolts are also traditional characteristics for clocks produced by this partnership. Elnathan Taber made the movements for the Simon Willard & Son business. The high quality of the movement and the clock overall is clearly consistent with both the Willards and Simon's finest apprentice. Taber of course was already in business for himself at this time but still had commercial ties with the Willards, best evidenced by his involvement with this important clock making partnership. Original steel pendulum rod and brass bob. Original weight. The lower box on the case retains its original glue blocks. Some of the blocks have been re-glued and the very bottom board has been nailed back in place at some point. Original tin weight baffle and brass tie down assembly.  Gilt acorn finial is an appropriate replacement. An exceptionally handsome example with nice clean presentation, and in very fine original condition. 
Price: Sold

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E. Howard & Co. Regulator No. 1

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1875

Outstanding original example of an Edward Howard & Co. Regulator No. 1 produced in Boston. This is the largest of the five banjo clocks that Howard produced at 50 inches. This model along with the No. 2 are by far the most difficult to find in original condition. The larger the clocks, the more they collapsed under their own weight over time and were damaged. Everything is heavy; the dial, the throat and lower door frames, large glasses, and the pendulum and weight, all of which lead to the lack of original examples found today. This clock exhibits all the signs of being "kept up with" and as a result its original components have survived. This size regulator was originally in the industrial/commercial category and as a result was not always treated with gentle care. Today, these are now highly desirable clocks in the home and are treated with the utmost care.  This clock has its original painted heavy iron dial signed "E. Howard & Co. Boston" with the surface in wonderful untouched condition. The dial has been shifted about an 1/8 of an inch at some point to better secure it to the case over time. As a result, the original mounting holes have been slightly expanded and partially filled. When spun back that 1/8 of an inch, all four dial mounting holes line up exactly with the original portion of the mounting screw holes in the head, along with the steel mounting pin marks which then line up exactly with the small triangular dial cutouts. There is no doubt that this is the original dial to this case.  Original clear glass over dial and classic diamond shaped steel hands.  Seconds bit is an appropriate old replacement. Outstanding original reverse painted glasses have survived in both the throat and the lower box frames. Original glasses are exceptionally difficult to find today in these large regulators.  The glasses are held in place by wooden strips and finishing nails, the majority being original. There are some expected replacement strips and pins to hold the glasses securely in the frames. The case is traditional Cherry Wood painted to simulate Rosewood. The surface is original, untouched and the grain painting is very lively.  Original glue blocks line the lower case box. The large brass eight day movement is original to the case and engraved in the upper left corner "E. Howard & Co. Boston". The Regulator No. 1 came with two movement and dial configurations when manufactured by E. Howard & Co (vs. Howard and Davis). When the dial winding hole is at the numeral three, the movement has rectangular shaped plates, as is the case with this clock. When the dial winding hole is at the numeral 2, the movement plates are trapezoidal in shape. Original gilt decorated pendulum rod and original damascene decorated large brass pendulum bob. Original brass tie down assembly. Original wooden weight baffles in both the lower box and throat sections. The black painted surface on the lower weight baffle has been touched up slightly. Original weight engraved with numeral "1".  Very fine original set up instructions label on the very bottom board. Matching inventory number "17" in multiple places on case and hardware. An exceptional E. Howard Regulator No. 1., and overall the finest original example I have ever seen. 
Price: Please Call or E-Mail for Price.

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Elnathan Taber Gilt Banjo Clock

Roxbury Massachusetts - Ca. 1815

Nice original example of a signed gilt front banjo clock made by Elnathan Taber. The clock was made in Roxbury Massachusetts and is of very high quality typical of clocks produced by Taber.  The clock has its original painted iron dial signed "E. Taber, Roxbury".  Surface has some touch up primarily in the white area above the center arbor.  Very lower portion of numerals XI, XII and I are touched as well. The remainder of the numerals and fine script signature are not touched. Dial surface lightly cleaned at some point likely at time of in-painting.  Outstanding original open diamond shaped steel hands. The clock retains its original reverse painted glasses held in place by the original wood strips and steel pins. Some touch up primarily to red interior background on box and throat glasses. Very interesting patriotic and highly colorful glasses are similar to the Aaron Willard Sr. banjo clock pictured lower on this page. Note in particular the multi-colored exterior border. The clock has nice original gilded frames which had an overcoat of gold paint which has been cleaned off to reveal the original gilded surface. Some touch up was needed to missing areas in this process.  Very unique attachment of the rabbeted throat frame to the case using two steel pins in the lower throat case sides, which meet corresponding holes in the rear of the gilt frames in place of lower tongue or tabs found in most cases of the Period. Placement of the pins is similar in concept to the early placement of screws through lower portion of crossbanded frames. The case is of fine quality and the lower box is lined with original glue blocks and retains the original tin weight baffle and brass pendulum tie-down. Original brass bezel. Brass sidearms and ball and eagle finial are appropriate Period replacements. Original eight day brass T-bridge movement is attached to case with original diagonal through bolts. Original pendulum rod and brass bob.  An impressive original Period banjo clock made by Simon Willard's best apprentice, with fine form and proportions typical of his work. Elnathan Taber worked over a long period of time on his own and always produced higher quality pieces than his peers, far more in keeping with the original quality and production requirements learned from the Willards. 
Price: Sold

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L.W. Noyes Wood Front Banjo Clock

Nashua New Hampshire - Ca. 1830

Very fine original example of a signed wood front banjo clock with rare burl mahogany panels. The clock was made by Leonard W. Noyes in Nashua New Hampshire and has all the classic features of his clocks and the New Hampshire area.  The clock has its original painted iron dial with the surface in untouched condition. The dial is signed "Warranted by L.W. Noyes". Original clear glass over dial and steel hands.  The burl mahogany panels in both the throat and box frames are original to the clock and are in excellent condition. Normal surface cracks in the veneer consistent with age. These slight surface cracks occur due to warping of the panels over time and are expected. Several of the steel pins which hold the panels in place have been replaced which is also common as the warping tends to push the original pins out of place. Burl mahogany veneer panels such as these are rarely found on New England clocks and add a very dramatic aesthetic to the clock. Wood front banjo clocks are hard enough to find with original mahogany veneer panels let alone such decorative panels as these. The case has half round mahogany frames with several age cracks but all is original with no missing pieces. The case surface is original and has a fine patina.  The large chimney on the case is typical of clocks made by Noyes and is original. The brass ball and eagle finial is a Period and appropriate replacement. Original brass bezel and New Hampshire sidearms. Note the reverse diamond or bow-tie shapes in the sidearms and large sweeping shape, all of which is typical of the sidearms used on clocks of New Hampshire origin in the Period. Original glue blocks line the lower case box along with the original tin weight baffle. Very bottom board has two later off-center holes indicating likely later Victorian bracket may have been added as decoration and subsequently properly removed. Nice Roman numeral inventory numbers in the case "XXXVll". Original eight day brass movement. Original pendulum rod and brass bob.  A fine original Period banjo clock made by one of the most prolific New Hampshire makers with all the traditional features from that area with the added bonus of wonderful lively burl mahogany panels in the frames. 
Price: SOLD

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Unsigned Stencil Front Banjo Clock

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1830

Wonderful original example of a stencil decorated frame banjo clock made in the Boston area. The clock has its original painted iron dial with the surface in untouched condition. Original clear convex glass over dial and steel hands.  Retains the original case surface including the black painted and stencil decorated throat and box frames. Some expected wear to the stencil designs but they are completely untouched. The frames house the original throat and lower box reverse painted glasses held in place by the original blocks and finishing nails. The reverse paintings have just some minor normal paint losses and are in untouched condition.  The lower box depicts a woman seated on a period sofa on stage with attractive and colorful curtains falling to each side of her.  The throat has a typical paisley paint and gilt design with lively red and blue painted colors which perfectly match the corresponding colors in the interior border of the lower box glass. Both glasses retain the original matching white gesso exterior border.  Many of these stencil framed examples have geometric glasses and finding examples with original painted scenes is far more difficult. Original brass bezel and sidearms. Original glue blocks line the lower case box along with the original tin weight baffle. Original eight day brass movement is of typical Boston form and attaches to the case with a rear center bolt. Original pendulum rod and brass pendulum bob.  Gilt acorn finial is an excellent Period replacement and highly representative of what would have been found on this clock originally.  A highly untouched and original example of a difficult-to-find form of Period banjo clock with wonderful colors and presence. 
Price: Please Call or E-Mail for Price.

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Abiel Chandler New Hampshire Mirror Clock

Concord NH - Ca. 1830-1835

Outstanding and classic example of a New Hampshire mirror clock made by Abiel Chandler. The original painted iron dial is signed "A. Chandler". The painted dial surface is untouched and in superb condition. Beautiful original steel hands. One dial mounting block is replaced just above the numeral XII. It is placed precisely where the original block was. The long lower mounting block is original. Excellent original reverse painted glass over the dial. The painting exhibits the classic flame turned design found in similar New Hampshire mirror clocks. The glass has wonderful colors of light green, red and gilt designs and is held in place by the original glue blocks. The reverse painting has had no restoration and is in wonderful condition. The case retains its original gilt and black painted surface and the original brass rosettes on each of the four corner blocks. There are a couple of small areas where the surface has been touched up but this is very minor. This case surface is all one can ask for in these clocks with very vibrant gilding on the columns with just the wear expected with age. The mirror is a nice period replacement. The backboard behind the mirror is original and held in place with the original finishing nails. The clock has its original eight day brass movement held in place with two rear bolts through the back plate. Chandler used several different movement designs in these mirror clocks over the years. This clock has a very simple clean rectangular based design. Original pendulum rod and brass bob. Original black iron weight. The clock case is an excellent and desirable small size measuring just slightly over 28 1/2 inches long by 13 1/2 inches wide. This size is a shade smaller than most of Chandlers clocks which are typically 29 or 30 by 14. The proportions and form are excellent. Original mirror clocks in this condition are difficult to find today and one will look a long time to find a better example. Simply a wonderful signed mirror clock by Abiel Chandler in very fine original condition with superb colors and form. 
Price: Sold

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William Cummens Presentation Gilt Front Banjo Clock

Roxbury MA.- Ca. 1825

Fine original example of an early full presentation gilt front William Cummens banjo clock with labeled chariot scene. Original dial is signed "Warranted by William Cummens". The dial surface is untouched and completely original. The signature is in the finest condition of any original William Cummens examples I have seen. There are the usual scratches and wear associated with age and use but I would classify this dial as outstanding. It is held in place by two bent screws and two guide pins which is typical for Cummens clocks. The original steel barbed hands are also typical of William Cummens in that the arrow and barbs are shorter than those used by other Boston area clockmakers. This clock retains its original glasses with a colorful and nicely executed chariot scene labeled “Neptune” in the lower box. While Neptune chariot scenes are not unusual, labeled Neptune scenes are very rare. The original throat glass is extraordinarily colorful and has a white gesso outer border and gilt and multi-colored interior design matching the lower box glass. Both glasses are still held in place by several original glue blocks, with a few replacements as well. The case retains its original finish and gilded surface on the frames with some touch up and repair to a small section of the rope molding. The thin upper tongue on the throat frame which slips under the dial has been well repaired. The lower presentation bracket is original to the clock. The form is a bit more pronounced than most. There is typical wear and darkening to parts of the gilding but overall it's quite nice. The gilded acorn finial is period and possibly original to the clock. The lower box retains its original side latch to secure the door as well as most of its original glue blocks. Weight pan is an old replacement. Original brass bezel and side arms. The original eight day brass movement has an off center ‘T’ bridge suspension, another typical characteristic of William Cummens, and mounts to the case with the original diagonal through-bolts. Original Weight. A very nice signed gilt front presentation banjo clock in original condition with a  desirable labeled chariot scene in the lower glass.
Price: Sold

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Simon Willard & Son Stencil Front Banjo Clock

Boston, Massachusetts - Ca. 1825

Very fine and rare signed full presentation stencil front banjo clock made by Simon Willard and Son. This was a partnership of Simon Willard Sr. and Simon Willard Jr. which was in business from 1823 to 1828. The dials on the clocks produced by this firm were signed in several different ways. While all have the firm name Simon Willard & Son, some have an inventory number just below the name, Boston (as this one does), Boston with an inventory number, and other examples have nothing at all following the firm name. While there are several excellent references in many of the books for clocks made by this partnership, for a virtually identical example see Brooks Palmers "The Book Of American Clocks" figure 143. This clock is in excellent original condition. The original painted iron dial is signed "Simon Willard & Son, Boston". The signature and numerals are untouched. There is one scratch in the white background that has been touched up above the center arbor. The dial is held in place by four turned screws and two guide pins. Very fine original barbed steel hands. The original eight day brass movement is attached to the case with two diagonal through bolts, which was the mounting scheme traditionally used by this firm. There is a nice cleaning record scratched into the front plate of the movement by Elnathan Taber. The stenciled surface is original on both the clock frames and the presentation bracket. The lower bracket, which is original to the case, also features a nice two tone gilding on both the drop finial and the very upper lip of the bracket. A similar treatment on the bracket of another stencil front banjo clock can be seen in Paul Foley's "Willard's Patent Time Pieces" on page 137. The clock retains its original reverse painted glasses which have outstanding colors. Both the throat and box glasses have a light mustard exterior background with red and gilt interior designs set off against a darker mustard  field. The contrast in the colors of these glasses is quite dramatic. Very minor background touch up done to both glasses long ago. Original surface on the sides of the case. Original brass bezel and sidearms. Very fine and appropriate gilt acorn finial. A superior signed presentation banjo clock with rare stenciled frames and wonderful glasses.
Price: Sold

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Sawin and Dyar Lyre Banjo Clock

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1822-1827

Wonderfully carved mahogany true lyre banjo clock signed by John Sawin and George Dyar. This famous partnership was a prolific maker of lyre timepieces in the mid-1820's. The clock is signed "Sawin & Dyar, Boston" in flowing script on the dial. The painted iron dial is original and is in excellent untouched condition. Original steel hands. Original brass bezel and glass over dial. The  case is remarkable on this clock. The surface is original and has the finest carving I have ever seen on any lyre banjo. The carving consists of vines. leaves and a cornucopia terminating in two serpents heads, all on a background with a punched snowflake design. This background design is associated with the Salem Massachusetts cabinetmakers and carvers. Several fine and well documented carvers were working in Salem during the years in which Sawin and Dyar were producing clocks. The mahogany veneered throat panel is original to the case and has excellent graining. There is an age crack at the very bottom of the panel. These age cracks are often found on the original panels of wood front banjos. The case has wonderful proportions and is referred to as a true lyre which is the finest form of the lyre cases made during this early period. Original lower bracket and acorn drop finial. Original eight day brass movement is mounted to the case with diagonal screws through the backplate with a cotter pin mounting scheme. Original plinth and a very impressive gilt eagle finial.  An exceptional early signed lyre banjo in fine original condition.
Price: Sold

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Edmund Currier Gilt Mirror Clock

Salem Massachusetts - Ca. 1828-1830 

Impressive gilt mirror clock made and signed by Edmund Currier. The case is fully gilded with alternating water and oil based gilded half round columns. Wonderful raised gesso designs on both the corner blocks and half round moldings. Gilding on the clock is original and in excellent condition. Original reverse painted glass over dial is superb with gilt and red shields in the corners, multi-colored floral designs throughout, and thin gilt round interior border, all on a rich dark burgundy background. Original mirror and backboard held in place by the original finishing nails. The original heavy iron concave dial mounts to the case with two bent screws and retains its original painted surface with a wonderful "E. Currier" signature just below the center arbor. Nice original steel hands. Original eight day brass movement is held in place with a single rear center bolt. Very interesting original "tombstone" weight pan inside the clock case receives the weight as it falls. All interior case glue blocks are original. A very lively and clean New England mirror clock by one of the prolific makers of period wall clocks including banjos, lyres and mirror clocks with a highly striking appearance. Overall a superb and important example of Edmund Currier's work. Clock case is 34 1/2 inches tall by 16 1/2 inches wide
Price: Sold

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Samuel Abbott Boston Mirror Clock

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1827-1830

Outstanding Gilt Boston Mirror clock made by Samuel Abbott. This unique mirror clock form is quite rare. Clock case retains its original fully gilded surface. The original signed painted iron dial is in excellent condition with beautiful bold script signature of Samuel Abbott. The dial surface is untouched. Original steel hands. Original clear glass over dial and original mirror in lower portion of case. Inside this clock are many special features as well. Original eight day brass Grand Piano movement which is a signature itself for the work of Samuel Abbott. Original paper label on interior of backboard. The label has some expected losses given that the weight runs directly over it but most has survived and is now under protective plastic cover. The clock has its original narrow weight which is guided down the case as it runs by two steel rods. Original pendulum rod and brass bob. Clock is nicely proportioned at 31 1/2 inches in height by 15 1/2 inches wide. Movement has a servicing record scratched into the front plate by Elnathan Taber, who serviced many Boston area clocks from this period. A forty year old catalog from a small Pennsylvania auction house included this very clock, documenting that at one time it was part of the very impressive Canton Ohio collection of Dr. Oscar and Betty Clovis. Photocopies of the auction catalogue can be provided with the clock if desired. While New Hampshire is clearly the home of the mirror clock, the surrounding areas of Boston and Maine also produced some impressive examples which are far more difficult to find, especially in original condition.​
Price: Sold

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E. Howard & Co. Special Order Gallery Clock

Boston Mass. - Ca. 1875

Exceptional Gallery Wall Clock in impressive mahogany case with black painted plate glass dial, gilt numerals and clock maker's signature. This clock style does not appear in the Howard catalogues and is a variant of the Gallery # 73 model. The E. Howard Clock Co. produced several special order clocks over the years which are highly desirable. This clock is certainly another such example found. It is a commercial sized model measuring 27 inches high by 23 inches wide, with a 16 inch dial diameter. The provenance documented in the clocks interior indicates that it was purchased directly from the New England Life Insurance Company in 1937. This is the period in which this Insurance Company moved its headquarters from a building constructed in 1875 at 37 Milk Street in Boston to Boylston Street where it still exists today. This clock was likely a special order for the new headquarters built in 1875 and sold to the public during the period of relocation. The clock retains its original plate glass dial held place by the original putty as well as the original large shaped brass hands. The gilt numerals and signature are original with minor touch up while the background has been re-blacked similar to many Howard glasses of the period. The impressive clock case retains its original surface with a light cleaning at some point. Original mahogany panel in the lower box as well as the original lock. Minor chipping to the very upper right door molding from rubbing against the round bezel. The movement is a large classic E. Howard style with a three pulley compound configuration to run eight days. It sits on the original seat board and retains its original painted wooden pendulum rod and brass bob as well as the original weight. The movement is embossed "E. Howard Clock Company, Boston" on the upper left corner. The thick molded bezel is mounted to the case on two large original dowels and secured with three screws. There are no additional holes in the head of the case. There is a fourth screw under the numeral VI which serves no purpose as it would interfere with the pendulum rod. Indicative that this bezel may have been used on other Gallery Models produced during the period excluding the lower drop box. A highly attractive and very unusual model for custom commercial order by the E. Howard Clock Co. in fine original condition.
Price: Sold

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Eli Porter Inlaid Tall Case Clock

Williamstown, Ma. Circa 1810

Highly inlaid formal cherry tall case clock made and signed by Eli Porter on both the dial and the movement. The form of this clock is quite unique and follows very closely the work of Daniel Porter, Eli’s uncle, who trained and worked with Eli in Williamstown. Daniel Porter was an apprentice to Daniel Burnap in East Windsor CT which shows in the quality of the movements produced by the Porters. Eli took over the Porter family clock business following Daniel’s death in 1809. While Daniel’s clocks exhibited nicely inlaid cases, this particular example has truly exceptional and diverse dark and light colored inlays throughout the case. All of the string inlay on the clock is in three contrasting layers. The workmanship in this case is rarely seen in any region but is particularly impressive given that the clockmaker was in a country area such as Williamstown. The case, which has wonderful form, was likely made in the nearby Berkshire region and rivals the inlay work done in any of the major Cities in the Northeast at that time. This very clock appears in two books, Wallace Nutting’s “Furniture Treasury” Volume two figure 3267 and in Brooks Palmer’s “The Book Of American Clocks” figure 49.

The hood has a very fine and classic broken arch pediment with checkerboard inlaid terminals. The finial plinths have a wide mosaic type inlay pattern which also extends impressively down both sides of the tympanum. There is a very fine curved molding with tight bookend inlays coming down from the center finial plinth and a restored inlaid keystone in the center of the hood molding. The hood has two fluted colonnettes with brass capitals and bases. The door frame has triple string inlay in a light-dark-light pattern. There is an age crack in the left object scroll. Original door glass has a barely noticeable tight corner crack about ¼ inch in length just above the corner spandrel over the numeral 10. The hood contains all of its original glueblocks and has its original Hepplewhite door pull. Ball and spire brass finials are nice old replacements.

The frieze above the full length door has three sets of light-dark bookend inlay separated by two rectangular mahogany veneers. The fluted quarter columns in the waist rest on short mahogany veneered plinths with matching checkerboard inlay at both the top and bottom of the columns. The shaped door has a central dome at the top inlaid with writhing light and dark fans. In the very center of the door there is a vertical Gothic oval of grained mahogany veneer surrounded by triple stringing which terminates at the top and bottom in a wonderful looping pattern. 

The base of the clock is nicely framed with dark mahogany veneer and has a mahogany veneered horizontal Gothic oval in the center containing another light and dark writhing fan design. The mahogany oval is surrounded by triple stringing with the same wonderful loop design in each corner matching those on the waist door. There is a single horizontal band of mosaic inlay which is set into the mahogany veneer framing at the bottom of the base and sits just above the French feet and beautifully shaped apron. The French feet are original to the case and are in fine condition with just normal chipping and fine cracks. The base retains all its original glueblocks as well.

The case surface has an old refinish and retains a fine rich patina. The case interior is untouched and shows its country origins in the shape of the glueblocks and the rough corner blocking which runs the length of the front of the case interior. At the top of the backboard is the original and undisturbed borings to make room for the suspension bridge and swing of the crutch which holds the pendulum rod. The backboard also has singular marks made by the original pendulum rod rating nut and large brass bob indicating that the original movement placement has never been adjusted in any way. 

The original signed painted iron dial is in magnificent condition and is completely undisturbed including the original revolving moon dial in the lunette and the central calendar wheel. The dial is signed “Warranted and Made by Eli Porter”, has fine Arabic numerals, dotted minutes with Arabic markers placed every five minutes, and colorful floral corner spandrels edged in raised gilt gesso. The dial was made by the Osborne Manufactory of Birmingham, England and has a cast iron false plate behind the dial with the name ‘Osborne’ engraved into it. The calendar dial is also engraved on the back “Osborne Manufactory, Birmingham”. The clock retains its original Chippendale steel hands and seconds bit.  

The original eight day time and bell strike brass movement is large and has solid heavy brass plates, with tapered knopped and cuffed brass pillars, anchor recoil escapement, grooved winding drums, and a rack and snail striking mechanism on the front plate. The front plate contains a worn script signature by the maker “Made and Warranted by Eli Porter”. The movement sits on the original seatboard. The wooden pendulum rod and large brass bob are also original. The movement is finely made and similar to those made by Eli’s teacher, Daniel Porter. This type of fine craftsmanship dates back to Daniel Burnap who trained Daniel Porter and further to Thomas Harland, trainer of Daniel Burnap. Despite working in the countryside, Porter movements were of the highest quality, and their case continued to be handcrafted with the utmost sophistication.  

This is a stunning clock with fine form and magnificent inlays in superior original condition. Clock is 7 feet 6 inches to the top of the center finial.

Price: Sold

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E. Howard & Company No. 9 Regulator

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1880

Outstanding Figure Eight Regulator with the excellent proportions of the #9 in this series. The original signed painted iron dial is immaculate and untouched with a wonderful E. Howard & Co. script signature. Original hands. All three glasses are original and undisturbed. The two lower reverse painted glasses are the best I have seen in this type of clock and are held in place by the original wood blocks and finishing nails. The form and color scheme is typical Howard and the red is a nice bright vibrant shade. The reds came in different shades with this being the most desirable. The reverse paintings are untouched and in superb condition. Original eight day brass movement embossed on front plate "E. Howard & Company Boston". Original gilded wooden pendulum rod, damascene brass pendulum bob and tie down hardware. The decoration on the pendulum bob is particularly bold and well done. These also were offered in different forms from just simple concentric circles to the top form which was this type of design (see detailed photos for close up). Original black painted weight baffle. The weight is engraved "4" which is often found in #9's. This practice regarding weight and movement #'s is often seen in Howard clocks as the same movement and weight combinations were commonly used in a different regulator series (i.e. Banjos and Figure Eights) . An inventory number of "15" is found on the head of the case, the rear of the dial mounting board and the back of the weight baffle. The fine walnut case is in very nice condition with the original surface which has been cleaned and well cared for over the years. As with so many of these clocks the weight cord did break at some point and the weight struck the bottom of the case. The construction of the lower case is designed to give way when this happens to spare the glasses but usually did not separate cleanly at the lower joint. This causes a crack in the side of the case which has been properly glued and mended on both sides. 37 1/4 inches. A very special example of this regulator in uniquely fine condition.
Price: Sold

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Grant and Loring Stencil Front Banjo Clock

Boston Massachusetts - Ca. 1828

Rare and original signed stenciled frame banjo clock. This clock was made by the partnership of William Grant and Henry Loring who were together in business for only one year in 1828.  William Grant was a very well known and documented clock maker both before and after this partnership with Loring. The clock is nicely signed on the dial "Grant and Loring, Boston". This very clock is pictured and described in detail in Paul Foley's "Willards Patent Timepieces" on page 140 and further on page 259. The original painted iron dial surface is untouched.including the fine signature. Original steel barbed hands. The clock retains its original reverse painted glasses which are in fine condition. The throat has a gilt red and green foliate design with a white exterior border very typical to the Boston area clocks and the box glass has a nice country scene with a matching white exterior border and gilt and red interior border. There is some minor touch up to the white border on the throat glass. Original stenciled frames have a nice vibrant color which can be seen in the close up photos. The surface of the frames is undisturbed. Original brass sidearms and bezel. Brass ball and spire finial is an appropriate replacement. Original eight day brass movement. Very clean and fine early signed banjo clock with rare stenciled frames.
Price: Sold

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Aaron Willard Sr. Banjo Clock

Boston, Massachusetts - Ca. 1810-1815

Very early and impressive gilt front banjo clock signed by Aaron Willard Sr. While Simon, his father, and Aaron Jr., his son, made many banjo clocks, Aaron Sr. focused far more on Tall Case clocks and Massachusetts shelf clocks. Very seldom does one come across an Aaron Sr. banjo clock. Of the few Aaron Sr.'s that I have come across over the years, each has been uniquely signed over the top of the center arbor, as this clock is. The clock exhibits all the earliest features including T-bridge suspension, large throughbolt mounted movement, heavy iron dial, outstanding proportions and thin uniform head. Also exhibits very early style of glass paintings which are shown in Paul Foley's book "Willard's Patent Timepieces" on pages 29 and 189 from a Simon Willard clock. This clock has it's original painted iron dial with signature, numerals and white painted background undisturbed. Original hands. Original eight day brass movement mounted to case with diagonal throughbolts and T-Bridge suspension. Original gilding on turned rope molded frames with just some very minor repairs to original rope molding. Original large turned gilded acorn finial. Original reverse painted glasses with wonderful colors and designs on an interior mustard and red field, with thin mult-colored exterior border on box and throat glasses. The glasses have been over-painted on the backs to preserve the paintings at some point. Tight corner crack in lower left object side of box glass. Original weight. Original brass sidearms and bezel. This particular clock was in a private collection on the South Shore of Connecticut for about 30 years before surfacing recently for sale. Wonderful early Willard banjo clock, and one of the few Aaron Sr. banjo clocks that is actually correct.
Price: Sold

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William Cummens Gilt Front Banjo Clock

Roxbury MA.- Ca. 1815-1820

​Very fine original example of an early William Cummens banjo clock. Original dial is signed "Waranted by Wm. Cummens". This clock retains its original glasses with a beautifully executed battle scene from the War of 1812 in the lower box. The pendulum bob is viewed through a wonderful gold lyre shaped aperture. The “Patent” throat glass is extraordinarily colorful and in a style often found on William Cummens patent timepieces. There are three hairline fractures in the throat that have been professionally bonded and are barely visible. The clock retains its original fluted urn and spire finial (there is a crack on one side). The original painted iron dial is worn and has had some touch up to the white background primarily along the edges. One can easily make out the script name of ‘Wm. Cummens’ while the ‘Warranted by’ has worn off . The original steel barbed hands are also typical of William Cummens in that the arrow and barbs are shorter than those used by other Boston area clockmakers. The case retains its original finish and gilded surface on the frames. There is typical wear to the gilding but overall is quite nice. The box retains its original ‘L’ shaped screw to open and close the door as well as its original glue blocks. Original brass bezel and side arms. The original eight day brass movement has an off center ‘T’ bridge suspension, another typical characteristic of William Cummens, and mounts to the case with diagonal through-bolts.The original fillister head screws are missing which is often the case as this did not prove to be the strongest method of securing the movement over time. The movement is now attached with screws through the original holes in rear plate. Original Weight. This clock was purchased from a Charleston, South Carolina estate. A very colorful early gilt front banjo clock by one of the most important and prolific makers of the time, in original condition and with highly sought after War of 1812 glasses.
Price: Sold

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